[Epub] ↠ The Math of Life and Death: 7 Mathematical Principles That Shape Our Lives Author Kit Yates – Pimply.info

The Math of Life and Death: 7 Mathematical Principles That Shape Our Lives This is a fantastic book on Mathematics but is a little bitadvanced for novices It covers a lot of topics all of which amaze one when the maths behind them is revealed Of particular interest is the last chapter which deals with the modeling of pandemics this book was written before covid 19 became a thing Highly recommended by me FWIW. No Formulas Just Numb3rs In this book about how math shapes our lives, British math professor Yates doesn t take us into the algebra, geometry, and even trigonometry that we all use daily whether we realize it or not Instead, he takes an approach similar to the now decade old US television show Numb3rs, starring David Krumholtz and Rob Morrow, wherein he shows applications of higher level mathematics in fields such as epidemiology, medicine, law, journalism, elections, and several others Y No Formulas Just Numb3rs In this book about how math shapes our lives, British math professor Yates doesn t take us into the algebra, geometry, and even trigonometry that we all use daily whether we realize it or not Instead, he takes an approach similar to the now decade old US television show Numb3rs, starring David Krumholtz and Rob Morrow, wherein he shows applications of higher level mathematics in fields such as epidemiology, medicine, law, journalism, elections, and several others Yates cites real world examples including unjust convictions and Ebola outbreaks and many others to show how math was used incorrectly and what the math actually showed in that situation, to help the reader begin to get an overall sense of math without getting bogged down in the technical calculations Truly an excellent book for even thearithmophobic among us, as it shows the numbers all around us and explains how we can have a better sense of them.Disclaimers 1 I LOVED Numb3rs back in the day and would still be watching it if it were still on the air 2 I have a computer science degree and very nearly got secondary mathematics education and mathematics bachelors degrees at the same time as my CS one so obviously I m a bitattuned to math than others This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here I was never very good at math growing up in China where I never fully understood why I needed to do the proof of equations in math classes Now as a professional, I am doing a job which forces me to work in math a lot Slowly seeing the magic of math everywhere from pharmaceutical to industrial production, from sales to oil and gas, and see the value math brings, I started to appreciate it a lot This will be a book I want to send as a gift to my kids and my nephews to get them see the power of I was never very good at math growing up in China where I never fully understood why I needed to do the proof of equations in math classes Now as a professional, I am doing a job which forces me to work in math a lot Slowly seeing the magic of math everywhere from pharmaceutical to industrial production, from sales to oil and gas, and see the value math brings, I started to appreciate it a lot This will be a book I want to send as a gift to my kids and my nephews to get them see the power of math in everyday life from when they are little I want them to understand that math is a powerful tool when you use it wisely, it produces society with great impact If you didn t use it right, it could blind people and lead to huge loses and unfairness or cost lives below are just some notes I made for myself There are seven chapters in the book 1 Thinking ExponentiallyUncover the connection between exponential behavior with everyday phenomena eating snacks, bacteria growth, deposit in bank, credit card late payment, Pyramid scheme , nuclear reaction, ice bucket challenge ,and population explosion This has made the point very clear that the rule of exponential growth can be seen everywhere in life2 How math makes medicine manageableLots of the medical tests are imprecise e.g.23andMe and the BMI, breast cancer test , sometimes the high false positive will make people question the cost benefit balance of the test screening programs Knowing these shake the unquestioning attitude towards the accuracy of health test for us, even extremely accurate test can be hugely imprecise This chapter really reminded me of the broad brushed percentile record the doctors gave to me and my husband when we were doing ultra sound test during pregnancy ecological fallacy and reminded me the time when I have my baby did x ray suggested by a dentist, which now I think might have done herharm than discovering any true problem 3 Mathematics in the lawThis is probably the saddest chapter in the book with Sally Clark s story told through the chapter The author discussed several problem with the case guilty until innocent , the wrongly calculated 73 million to one probability, the independence mistake and the ecological fallacy , the prosecutor s fallacy, blinded by math 4 Debunking media statisticsThis is the chapter that I relates to the most The author has describes cases where media manipulate data One example is Lanc me ad for its anti aging line pseudoscience There are also cases where the media fudging the headline to make their story stands out or create fake news The author suggests that ultimately, the degree to which we believe the stats we come across should depend on how complete a picture the artist paints for us If it is a richly detailed realist landscape with context a trusted source clear expositions and chains of reasoning then we should be confident in the veracity of the numbers If however it is a dubiously inferred claim supported by a minimalist single statistic on an otherwise empty canvas we should think hard about whether we believe this truth As a practitioner, I also know how easy it is to manipulate result or present it to bias people s view It always benefit one party or another to put a spin on a particular finding to suggest correlation, to promote argument or advance someone s agenda We need to be really careful o being too readily to be convinced Let s be skeptical and ask forexplanation before start to draw any conclusion.Not only media, consulting service sometimes also have slants on stories when it comes to interpreting numbers or reporting facts They may even call it the art for science So again knowing that Statistics can be cherry picked to present a particular angle on a story The author has done a great job help to demystify the tricks traps and expose mathematical manipulations employed Rather than perceiving them as indisputable facts There are also some practical tricks we can use to get free drinks food from bets Like how many people do you need in a group to find one pair who share the same birthday, which I find very interesting 5 Number system6 Optimization algorithmIn this chapter, the author described one of the 7 millennium prize problem N vs NP hard It is often easier to verify a correct solution to a problem than it is to produce the solution in the first place The P vs NP challenge asks whether every problem they can be checked efficiently by a computer can also be solved efficiently For example once a jigsaw is complete it is easy to check that it has been done correctly More rigorous definition of what efficiency means are expressed mathematically in terms of how quickly the algorithm works as the problem getscomplicated whenpieces are added to the puzzle The set of problems that can be solved quickly is called P polynomial time A bigger group of problems that can be checked quickly but not necessarily solved quickly is known as NP Nondeterministic Polynomial time One of the NP question is Travel salesman problem and vehicle routing The yes no decision version of the traveling salesman problem is known as NP complete A powerful theorem tells us that if we ever come up with a practical algorithm that solves one NP complete problem, then we would be able to transmute this algorithm to solve any other NO problem, proving that P equals NP Since almost all internet cryptography relies on the difficulty of solving certain NP, proving P equals NP could be distorts for our online security Ironically, some of the most astounding scientific discoveries have relied enormously on the creative thinking of highly trained and dedicated individuals If P equals to NP, then computers would be able to find formal proofs of any mathematical theorem that is provable Many of the greatest intellectual achievements of humankind might be reproduced and superseded by the work of a robot At its heat P versus NP is the battle to discover whether human creativity can be automated Other problems described here are Dijkstra s algorithm finds the shortest path in polynomial time Optimal stopping Hiring problem the 37 percent rule only works 37 % of the time but better than 10 % I like the argument the author made on how the algorithm can be biased and we need to be aware Even the genuinely pragmatic algorithm have hard coded biases they influence the direction in which the spotlight is shone on the global stage.We place trust in supposedly impartial algorithms because we are wary of obvious human inconsistencies and inclinations But although computers may implant algorithm in an objective manner following a predefined set of rules, the rules themselves are written by humans These programmed might hard code their bias consciences or unconscious directly into the algorithm itself, obfuscating their prejudice by translating them into computer code Several examples are provided here includeautomated pricing strategy, and Navinder Sarao algorithm to spoof the market in 2010 7 Mathematical epidemiology This chapter is about how math is used in controlling and understanding epidemics There are also some interesting points that the SIR model illustrates the importance of not coming in to work when unwell If everyone with an infectious disease followed this practice, we would all benefit This is the author s argument for the harm of presentism and he used Chipotle s case where their stuff who felt under the weather but still kept coming which ended up infect hundreds of people as example.Other story in this chapter also includes offering HPV vaccination to homosexuals to be cost effective However, approximately 85 percent of automated warnings in ICUs are false alarms If you re at all fascinated with numbers, you will love this book There are no actual formulas in this book, instead what it shows you is how math is a part of every aspect of our lives from medicine to law to sales This book is full of real life stories, many you might know from hearing about them in the news and many others that are just as powerful It breaks down the math behind the stories and shows the exa However, approximately 85 percent of automated warnings in ICUs are false alarms If you re at all fascinated with numbers, you will love this book There are no actual formulas in this book, instead what it shows you is how math is a part of every aspect of our lives from medicine to law to sales This book is full of real life stories, many you might know from hearing about them in the news and many others that are just as powerful It breaks down the math behind the stories and shows the examples of how mathematics is an integral part of our lives even if it s not always obvious.The powerful part of this book is when it highlights all the ways in which mathematics has been used interpreted incorrectly and caused people s lives to be ruined or altered forever When a monitor in the ICU is muted because it beeps too much and then it can t beep when in fact it needs to, it can and does kill people When data is interpreted incorrectly as it often is it can and does cause innocent people to go to jail These are real life consequences of mathematical errors that cause people to behave in ways that inadvertently harm other people.This book is full of powerful examples that make you feel both cringe with horror and delighted I was so excited to find out that the ice bucket challenge had such a positive outcome Butoften than not, it s a sobering look at the role math plays in our lives and the harm we can do when we misuse it.I loved reading this book and if numbers are your thing at all, I can t recommend it enough.thank you to Scribner and netgalley for an early copy in exchange for an honest review The Maths of Life and Death, written by Kit Yates, who is a senior lecturer in the Department of Mathematical Sciences and co director of the Centre for Mathematical Biology at the University of Bath, aims to show that maths is for everyone and that mathematics is first and foremost, a practical tool to make sense of our complex world This is a mission that I m definitely on board with I m convinced that maths is the worst taught of all school subjects in England due to the failure of cen The Maths of Life and Death, written by Kit Yates, who is a senior lecturer in the Department of Mathematical Sciences and co director of the Centre for Mathematical Biology at the University of Bath, aims to show that maths is for everyone and that mathematics is first and foremost, a practical tool to make sense of our complex world This is a mission that I m definitely on board with I m convinced that maths is the worst taught of all school subjects in England due to the failure of central government policies to attract and reward good teachers , leaving a lot of people with the idea that maths isn t for them It s frustrating to see people who are otherwise really smart refusing to even engage with an argument if it contains numbers or anything else sciency Yates s book, on the whole, definitely does a good job of explaining some basic mathematical concepts simply and clearly, and showing how they are relevant in the real world The book is almost entirely focused on statistics, and the one chapter that strays into the realm of pure mathematics on algorithms will probably be less accessible for the average reader However, having a solid understanding of some basic concepts in statistics is both vital and possible for everyone, and so I think this focus works well.I have to say that most of the examples used in The Maths of Life and Death were already familiar to me, which is probably the result of my amateur enthusiasm for statistics rather than any undue repetition on Yates s part, although there is a certain amount of crossover with Ben Goldacre s Bad Science Because I m interested in medicine, I was already familiar with the material on medical statistics covered in chapter two, and with much of the epidemiological information in chapter seven this, of course, is not Yates s fault, but because this chapter focuses on controlling global pandemics, it makes for a rather chilling read in the wake of Covid 19 Chapter three, on the law, retells the story of the infamous Sally Clark case, where statistics were used to prove that the chances of experiencing two stillbirths in the same family were 1 in 73 million, and so Clark must have murdered her two children as Yates shows, this figure could only have been arrived at through multiple statistical errors And I already knew about the birthday problem in chapter four, which shows that in any school class it slikely than not that two children share the same birthday, although I loved hearing the story of how Yates used this fact to pitch his literary agent, Chris Wellbelove, while they were having drinks in a pub I bet him the next round of drinks that I would be able to find two people, in the relatively quiet pub, who shared a birthday After a quick scan of the room, he readily took me on and indeed offered to buy the next two rounds if I could find such a pair, so unlikely did he think the prospect of a match Twenty minutes and a lot of baffled looks and superficial explanations later I had found my pair of birthday sharers and the drinks were on Chris.Yates s prose is clear and straightforward, which is absolutely necessary for a book of this type Occasionally, when he is trying to write about the bigger implications of statistics, it becomes a bit banal, but this isn t the case most of the time I also liked that he explained his calculations both in the text and through the use of diagrams I found the text easier to follow, but others would probably prefer the diagrams, so this works for everyone All in all, I d recommend this book as an accessible and important introduction to understanding the use and abuse of statistics 3.5 stars.I would like to thank Quercus for sending me a free copy of this book to review I have been a lifelong reader, I love learning and this book was right in my lane, enjoyed the new exposures. I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review albeit a bit late.This book was amazing Yes, I may fit a stereotypical audience math teacher , but this book really is for everyone It was easy to read and engaging, funny and informative The Math of Life and Death is one of those books that you just can t help sharing with others I constantly found myself asking my husband, did you know in regards to what I had just read A couple of ideas that really stood out to me 1 I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review albeit a bit late.This book was amazing Yes, I may fit a stereotypical audience math teacher , but this book really is for everyone It was easy to read and engaging, funny and informative The Math of Life and Death is one of those books that you just can t help sharing with others I constantly found myself asking my husband, did you know in regards to what I had just read A couple of ideas that really stood out to me 1 Medically, Two tests are better than one The amount of false positives are farthan false negatives at least percentage wise and it s far better to get a second test before completely freaking out over a diagnosis 2 Make sure your lawyer knows math and can use logic well.Perhaps most importantly is how timely this book is with what we are experiencing in the U.S for two reasons 1 blacklivesmatter right people all over the US are protesting police brutality especially as it pertains to black people I ve seen all over Facebook and twitter those trying to squash the movement because the police killwhite people than black people or there areblack on black killings and shouldn t we beworried about that Here is what Yates shows though you should definitely read pages 124 129 of the book for full details image hosting It seems that a black person walking down the street should bealarmed to see a police officer approaching than another black person That police officers have twice as high a per capita rate of killing white people than black people is because the country haswhite people That the rate is only twice as high, given that the United States has almost six times as many white people as black people is perhaps unsettling 2 COVID 19 The last chapter of Yates book is focused on epidemics More specifically How to stop an epidemic It was jarring to read this in the midst of a pandemic particularly one in which there has been little to no national leadership It was clearly shown that to mitigate the effects of illness we need to self isolate, wash our hands, contact trace Remember this was published BEFORE COVID affected our lives Also vaccination is a no brainer I genuinely believe that math is for everyone and that we can all appreciate the beautiful mathematics at the heart of the complicated phenomena we experience daily FINALLY FINALLY, I have found someone that LOVES numbers as much as I Everyone should have a head full of useless indifferent facts and figures, that amaze and bore those around them I love to shoot down faulty statistics, Jackson Hole WY had a 300% increase in female juvenile bank robbery in blaa blaa year When really, it means that 3 little girls ATTEMPTED to rob a bank well, that perhaps is sort of serious and noteworthy but a 300% increase is certainly misleading if you don t unde FINALLY FINALLY, I have found someone that LOVES numbers as much as I Everyone should have a head full of useless indifferent facts and figures, that amaze and bore those around them I love to shoot down faulty statistics, Jackson Hole WY had a 300% increase in female juvenile bank robbery in blaa blaa year When really, it means that 3 little girls ATTEMPTED to rob a bank well, that perhaps is sort of serious and noteworthy but a 300% increase is certainly misleading if you don t understand numbers Kit Yates is my hero well maybe not hero, but I certainly appreciate his nerdiness My one FYI and peeve is that he continues to tour guide you through the book, we will speakon this in Chapter 3 this will be covered in Chapter 7 and on and on Tue 4 star read for educational fun Happy Reading From Birthdays To Birth Rates To How We Perceive The Passing Of Time, Mathematical Patterns Shape Our Lives But For Those Of Us Who Left Math Behind In High School, The Numbers And Figures Hurled At Us As We Go About Our Days Can Sometimes Leave Us Scratching Our Heads And Feeling As If We Re Fumbling Through A Mathematical Minefield In This Eye Opening And Extraordinarily Accessible Book, Mathemati Cian Kit Yates Illuminates Hidden Principles That Can Help Us Understand And Navigate The Chaotic And Often Opaque Surfaces Of Our World In The Math Of Life And Death, Yates Takes Us On A Fascinating Tour Of Everyday Situations And Grand Scale Applications Of Mathematical Concepts, Including Exponential Growth And Decay, Optimization, Statistics And Probability, And Number Systems Along The Way He Reveals The Mathematical Undersides Of Controversies Over DNA Testing, Medical Screening Results, And Historical Events Such As The Chernobyl Disaster And The Amanda Knox Trial Readers Will Finish This Book With An Enlightened Perspective On The News, The Law, Medicine, And History, And Will Be Better Equipped To Make Personal Decisions And Solve Problems With Math In Mind, Whether It S Choosing The Shortest Checkout Line At The Grocery Store Or Halting The Spread Of A Deadly Disease This book has been going everywhere with me because its one of those books that I cannot stop reading Showed it to my friend Andrea on Wednesday when it arrived and she said she didn t like math Lots of people THINK they do not like math, yet they love the math they use every day and never think about.The author began by sharing how his 3 year old loves to gather snail in ths garden and how he asked one day how many snails were in the garden Instead of just saying I dont know , the author ma This book has been going everywhere with me because its one of those books that I cannot stop reading Showed it to my friend Andrea on Wednesday when it arrived and she said she didn t like math Lots of people THINK they do not like math, yet they love the math they use every day and never think about.The author began by sharing how his 3 year old loves to gather snail in ths garden and how he asked one day how many snails were in the garden Instead of just saying I dont know , the author made it a mathematical game Took a sharpie and made an X on the shells of the 23 snails his child had gathered and then put them back in the garden Then a week later they gathered snails and out of 18 only three had the X on the shell His calculations as a mathematical biologist showed roughly 138 snails lived in that area of the garden.It s a method used in various scientific calculations be it how many fish are in a lake, how much snow pack their is here in the Sierras to calculate how much water reservoirs, lakes, rivers will provide for a given year Needless to say we have been using his math game approach daily, and trust me if you think you do not like math, this book may well change your mind


About the Author: Kit Yates

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Math of Life and Death: 7 Mathematical Principles That Shape Our Lives book, this is one of the most wanted Kit Yates author readers around the world.


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