!!> Epub ➜ The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in our Times ➛ Author Barbara Taylor – Pimply.info

The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in our Times In July , Canadian Born Historian Barbara Taylor Was Admitted To Friern Hospital, A Once Notorious Asylum For The Insane Her Journey There Began When, Overwhelmed By Anxiety As She Completed Her Doctoral Studies In London, England, She Found Relief By Dosing Herself With Alcohol And Tranquillizers She Then Embarked On What Would Turn Out To Be A Decades Long PsychoanalysisThe Analysis Dredged Up Acutely Painful Memories Of An Unhappy And Confusing Childhood Back In Saskatoon As Taylor Struggled To Cope With These, She Would Twice Be Re Admitted To Friern She Took Refuge In Day Care Institutions And A Psychiatric Hostel, All The While Continuing Her Therapy, Which Eventually Put Her On The Road To RecoveryThis Searingly Honest, Beautifully Written Memoir Is The Narrative Of The Author S Madness Years, Set Inside The Wider Story Of Our Treatment Of Psychiatric Illness From The Great Age Of Asylums To The Current Era Of Community Care, Big Pharma , And Quick Fixes It Is A Meditation On Her Own Experience As Well As That Of Millions Of Others Both In Europe And In North America Who Have Suffered, Are Suffering, And Will Suffer From Mental Illness Not always an easy read, but I am really glad I perservered with this one It is a fascinating and important examination of mental health services, told within a framework of personal experience There is also some very interesting history of the treatment of mental health, and of the hospital that treated the author, Friern previously Colney Hatch Really recommended Blog post video here Not always an easy read, but I am really glad I perservered with this one It is a fascinating and important examination of mental health services, told within a framework of personal experience There is also some very interesting history of the treatment of mental health, and of the hospital that treated the author, Friern previously Colney Hatch Really recommended Blog post video here The Last Asylum A Memoir of Madness in Our Times This title, distilled to the three keywords asylum, memoir, madness is what caught my attention Together, of course, with a photo on the cover depicting the longest corridor in a mental institution the thing that Will Self called so beautifully the North Circular of the soul I promise myself this is the only nice thing I will ever say about Will Self.Barbara Taylor is an accomplished historian who went quite mad during her early thirti The Last Asylum A Memoir of Madness in Our Times This title, distilled to the three keywords asylum, memoir, madness is what caught my attention Together, of course, with a photo on the cover depicting the longest corridor in a mental institution the thing that Will Self called so beautifully the North Circular of the soul I promise myself this is the only nice thing I will ever say about Will Self.Barbara Taylor is an accomplished historian who went quite mad during her early thirties It started off innocently enough but soon enough she was doing psychotherapy five times a week, and eventually ended up in a looney bin Now, I wanted to feel for her but it was hard, because Taylor is no Sylvia Plath and her descriptions of her psychoanalysis and her descend into madness are not very interesting To be perfectly honest, to this lay reader it seemed that it was the daily psychoanalysis that was making her so unstable I am a very practical person who has gone through a short period of being very unwell mentally and I know for a fact that if I had spent my days vivisecting my childhood then, I would ve been medicating heavily now The problem I had with Taylor s account was that I could never understand what her madness really was, how the psychoanalysis was helping her and how she finally got better Blame my low empathy levels but I haven t read about a person struggling with her own mind and her demons I have only seen a baby emperor as she once aptly called herself She makes it almost impossible to feel any empathy towards her She was young, she didn t have to work 9 5, she drank a lot, had lots of sex with unsuitable men, had anxiety attacks and horrible dreams That s me and half of my friends on any given weekend Thank God, I absolutely cannot afford twenty one years of psychoanalysis Twenty one Daily Frankly, she doesn t make a good case for psychoanalysis She quotes constant shouting matches with her therapist and then even in the chapter called Cure I couldn t see how the cure had anything to do with those years of therapy She presented it as if she just grew out of it I don t doubt that she gained a disturbingly deep knowledge of herself but I don t see how knowing what makes you ill can make you better Additionally, her sister who obviously grew up with the same set of parents turned out perfectly fine So what s the point of this torturous analysis She does a way better job in the second part of the book where she takes on a role of a historian and observer and treats us to a crash course of the mental health system as well as insightful observations of her fellow patients Those parts are definitely the highlights of this book She describes asylums now almost all gone as generally safe places offering a respite from life with all its obligations once those obligations became unmanageable She also describes warmly the community feel of them, even despite the fact they were often violent places full of hostile patients Now the asylums are gone and have been replaced by the so called community care which emphasizes independence and self reliance For people weakened and often basically paralysed by a mental illness it doesn t seem to work very well Despite its many flaws Taylor is a defender of bins and I guess, so am I.So what s the lesson and note to myself here Don t go mad, Kinga Don t go mad Don t go mad because if you go mad there will be nowhere for you to go Wow I picked up this book thinking it was going to be another Bell Jar, but oh no This is by far the most detailed look on Asylums and Mental Health treatment in Westernized countries I ve ever read 5 stars for just being so thorough Some people may find this Memoir to be too dense or too educational I just found it to be an engrossing history on a topic I m completely interested in.Barbara Taylor is a historian While in college she wrote papers on the history of feminism She wrote a book Wow I picked up this book thinking it was going to be another Bell Jar, but oh no This is by far the most detailed look on Asylums and Mental Health treatment in Westernized countries I ve ever read 5 stars for just being so thorough Some people may find this Memoir to be too dense or too educational I just found it to be an engrossing history on a topic I m completely interested in.Barbara Taylor is a historian While in college she wrote papers on the history of feminism She wrote a book However the anxiety of all that she was doing and teaching became too much In 1988, Barbara was admitted into Friern Hospital, one of Britain s last asylums.Barbara s illness was very much involved The pain of living with herself and her feelings become so overwhelming Barbara started self medicating with alcohol and prescription pills In the early stages she decided to work on her inevitable demise by hiring a psychoanalyst Barbara and V worked together for 21 years She started her psychoanalysis at the age of 31, six years later she was in and out of Friern Hospital seeking treatment for her illness The illness is never given a name It could be depression anxiety, but I m not a doctor Barbara not only gives the reader an extremely well documented account of asylum politics she discusses herself through all of this Barbara kept journals of her 21 years with her psychoanalyst She weaves her story throughout the history telling, which makes for some amazing reading The timeline is all over the place because it is written in a way that even though the story is moving forward Barbara continues to give the reader facts and with these facts come references and sources I am so interested in the people she talked about in this book and their works Many of the people Barbara interviewed for this book have written their own memoirs of asylum life Asylums have a long history Most of us readers only know about what we see in the media, shackles, straight jackets, neglect, abuse Scary, dark times in large derelict buildings When Barbara was in and out of Friern she could still see the old ways, but new concepts were being introduced The sad thing about the Mental Health world is that the attitude toward the patients ebb and flow Doctors see their patients as people, then a few years later the attitude shifts and patients are a nuisance that needs to be medicated and forgotten, until the outside community catches on and starts a verbal war Then the politics change and everyone is for treating the patients again instead of ignoring them One of my favorite things about this book was V, the psychoanalyst He really was in it for the long haul The relationship between V and Barbara was like a parent At least in Barbara s eyes I found it fascinating.If you are interested in Mental Health and how it was treated throughout history in Western societies Canada, American and mostly in Great Britain pick this book up It has so many layers to it I love that you get two stories in one The story of our protagonist and her search for truth of self and her illness and the historical growth of the way society and the medical community thought of and treated people with mental illnesses disorders Britain s asylum system is a thing of the past You might expect this book to crow the author s triumph at their closure given she was a former patient of one , but that is not the case In fact, she seems to think their abolition is not entirely positive Along with her personal story, Taylor weaves in the history of mental asylums and psychoanalysis the latter not practiced in England until after World War I She raises pressing questions about how the mentally ill are treated today questi Britain s asylum system is a thing of the past You might expect this book to crow the author s triumph at their closure given she was a former patient of one , but that is not the case In fact, she seems to think their abolition is not entirely positive Along with her personal story, Taylor weaves in the history of mental asylums and psychoanalysis the latter not practiced in England until after World War I She raises pressing questions about how the mentally ill are treated today questions of independence and choice versus recovery and risk This is a powerful book, especially recommended for fans of Bad Blood See my full review at Nudge

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