[Ebook] ↠ Ghost Light Author Joseph O'Connor – Pimply.info

Ghost Light This Involving Novel Puts You Inside The Mind Of Molly Allgood, An Elderly Actress Wandering Around The Brilliantly Evoked 1950s London Of Crumbling Lodging Houses And Uncleared Bombsites Contrasting With The Down At Heel Circumstances To Which She Is Reduced Are Memories, Rendered With Sensuous Freshness And Vernacular Wit, Of Her Rich Past, Especially Her Love Affair In 1907 Dublin With The Abbey Theatre Playwright John Synge In Whose The Playboy Of The Western World She StarredPeter Kemp, The Sunday TimesLondon , Books Of The Year


10 thoughts on “Ghost Light

  1. says:

    Dublin 1907, a young Irish actress embarks on a doomed affair with John Millington Synge, the Irish playwright In the 1950s an old, impoverished woman makes her way across London, reminscing about her glory days as an acclaimed actress and her relationship with the enigmatic Synge This is a demanding


  2. says:

    Joseph O Connor has fashioned a marvelous novel, a reimaging of the love affair of John Millington Synge the famous playwright of Playboy of the Western World and other fine works and the younger, less well stationed Molly Allgood, who performed under the name of Maire O Neill Certain biographers will want to


  3. says:

    Beautiful evocation of Edwardian Dublin and the love affair between playwright J.M Synge and Abbey Theatre actress Maire O Neill The author used complicated tense changes present for Synge s or Maire s present 1907 until his death for him the year 1952 for her and past for each of their pasts An omnipotent narrator who


  4. says:

    Brilliant Writing But Difficult ReadingI really enjoyed O Connor s Star of the Sea and was eager to read Ghost Light This novel is a fictionalization of the life of Molly Allgood, who was in love with and engaged to John Synge the Irish playwright at the time of his death O Connor introduces us to Molly who is now sixty five year


  5. says:

    This is the first book by Joseph O Connor yes, he s the brother of Sinead O Connor I ve read, but I can tell you, it won t be the last I loved Ghost Light, and I intend on investigating this wonderful Irish author further Joseph O Connor s writing runs the gamut from non fiction and journalism to screenplays, stage plays, and novels, of wh


  6. says:

    Ghost Light by Joseph O Connor is a brilliant and complex book It is one of the best books I have read in the last five years The language is poetic and hallucinatory and this is a book where one can t skip passages or lines Every word is necessary and the whole is a gift put together with the greatest care and love.The novel is about a grand love a


  7. says:

    It took me a few attempts to get into it but I blame that on lack of sleep rather than the book itself The style of writing requires slow reading and a lot of concentration so that you don t miss any of the beautifully written prose The main character is Molly Allgood, an Irish actress living in London with little money at her disposal The book reminises abou


  8. says:

    There are some really wonderful, evocative lines passages in this book, but at page 109, I m generally bored I don t really feel any connection between the 2 main characters, just as in the main I feel that I am reading words, rather than being caught up in a story, a life, someone s actual thoughts experiences Perhaps that s what the author intends after all the 2 lov


  9. says:

    At first, I was disappointed by the novel but I soon realised I was wrong It is ostensibly about Molly, Synge s lover but it is also about old age, memory, moments in time, our lives and the living of them Our a...


  10. says:

    I had a really hard time getting through this book The abstract had me all excited to read the story of John Millington Synge and the woman he was engaged to at the time of his death, but that feltlike the secondary plot of Ghost Light The story is told through the eyes of Synge s fianc e, Molly Allgood, a.k.a Maire O Neill We follow her through a drunken day in London, and every so often


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